Saturday, January 18, 2020

How Far Should a State Have a Right to Monitor the Actions of People Within Its Borders?

The state should monitor the actions of people within its borders if such actions pose a threat to the national security. A nation's security is of an utmost importance to a country as it ensures the survivability of a country. It is with this reason that the government should have a right to monitor the actions of the people within its borders. This refers to individuals who engage in terrorist activities with the aim of conducting terrorist attacks in the country to instill fear in others. E. g. In Singapore, the government monitored the actions of Mas Selamat when the police received tip off of his plan to bomb the Singapore Changi Airport in 2002, where he was eventually arrested. The state should have a right to monitor the actions of the people within its borders, especially during stressful times such as war; as long as its monitoring does not result in the violation of human rights. Possessing the highest power, the state has jurisdiction in virtually all areas that society h as to deal with. Hence, it does have the right to monitor the actions of people. In times of war, famine, disease and violent acts will arise. In such times, the general public is unable to control and detain the situation, thus requiring the intervention of a higher power. For example, the state should have the right to implement a curfew during a war. This helps keep the people safe and reduces the chance of a violent protest or riot that may result in more deaths. Eg: During the 2010 clash between the red shirts and the yellow shirts in Thailand, the state intervened and imposed a curfew to monitor the actions of the Thais. This action has prevented more deaths and kept the people safe. Thus, the state should intervene in times of war to help control the situation. Government should not have the right to monitor actions of people when it comes to choosing one's life partner. Individuals should be given the freedom to decide with whom they would want to spend the rest of their lives with. If the government were to interfere in this issue, it would go against the basic human rights of freedom of choice. However, the state should not intervene when it violates human rights. The purpose of the state monitoring is to benefit the people; however when the state crosses the line and invades the privacy of people, this right should be revoked. Eg: the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in America has the authority to monitor anyone without the person legally consenting to it. This has resulted in the unhappiness of Americans and resulting in Americans losing faith in their legal system. Thus, the state should have a right to monitor the actions of people when in dire situations such as war but not at the expense of the privacy of people.

Friday, January 10, 2020

The Secret Details Regarding Course Work That People Do Not Know About

The Secret Details Regarding Course Work That People Do Not Know About Coursework writing is a fundamental assignment for higher classes, which is intended to create a better comprehension of subject. A zoology coursework is intended to be assigned for much better comprehension of the subject. Such writing companies help students score superior grades as crazy tone assignments place an incorrect impression. On the flip side, students who write excellent thesis discover that it's straightforward to compose excellent papers. You are able to choose the examination in centers around the nation. Nonetheless, the center is well known for being a multi-cultural affair where students get to find out more about different cultures. Adult education is available almost all over the Earth, therefore it's no surprise you're able to come across adult education courses in Washington DC. The above mentioned are a few of the more important expectations that students have from their digital marketing and advertising training. Standard class attendance is crucial as it requires discipline, time management abilities and enhances critical thinking abilities to each student. The student must make the best decision which most suits his profile and future career aspirations. The students score low marks since they submit low excellent work. Details of Course Work A round of miniature golf appeals to just about anyone who would like to play an intriguing game with a mixture of easy and hard holes. If you have trouble with the class, attempt to acquire help. Decide upon what you would like and check that the course that you're taking will provide what you're searching for. Decide whether you wish to construct an indoor or outdoor course before searching for an acceptable property. Today everyone wants to earn more money but few folks have time for second jobs. Most people today see the entire tree in a couple of glances. After high school, often it happens that people have to have a pass on attending college for several of factors. Most people somehow fail to complete their class since they did not attend regularly. Since it supplies you the tools to check upon when it's required! The training regime covers anatomy, medical terminology, physiology, and numerous laboratory procedures. You read the material, learn what things to do, and use the strategies online. In many instances, specific entry requirements through exams might also be required. In many instances, the program work isn't simple to grasp. The variety of cases beneath the mean in a standard distribution is equivalent to the range of cases over the mean, which make the mean and median coincide. It's not mandatory to enroll and attend the class but if you would like to fully grasp why su ch policies exist and why there's a demand for you to obey the rules and regulations being imposed, attendance is crucial to reach your target. Simply take the gear your course work taught you you will have to have on board, along with the items suggested by the firm. On the flip side, Chinese on-line course providers make usage of more structured audio-visual displays. The college partners with industries to make certain that students attain knowledge that's relevant in the modern competitive world. If you intend to start the company at home then it is essential that person should submit an application for the Post Office number as well so the customers can readily get in touch with them without any trouble. The Argument About Course Work Studying abroad at decent universities with courses to coordinate with your profile is an excellent choice. There are particular states which do not demand particular courses from homeschoolers. You should likewise be able to pay a non-re fundable college training course. In Colleges and Universities, you're competing with the smartest students from all over the state. In the instance of a non-credit class, you will not find a degree. Typically someone with a diploma or A.S. in Nursing is going to be in a position to earn their own Bachelor's, either on the internet or from a more conventional campus based program. An individual can go for the traditional MBA programs or secondary level. Students who intend to continue their education and get a Master's degree will want to meet language requirements by taking two decades of a foreign language.

Thursday, January 2, 2020

Positive Psychology A Brief History, Critics,...

Running Head: APPLICATIONS OF POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY 3 Positive Psychology: A Brief History, Methodology, and Application 1. Introduction 1.1. A Brief History The genealogy of positive psychology established its roots in the development of humanistic psychology in the mid-20th century. The more traditional approaches of modern psychology as developed by Freud and B. F. Skinner, respectively, are psychoanalysis, and behaviorism. One theory may suggest that the shift of the American labor movement from an industrial-based to a cognitive-cultural economy created the need for a more capable worker. As manufacturing and factory-style work diminished, sectors such as business, financial and personal†¦show more content†¦The field of positive psychology has greatly expanded the conversation regarding positive experiences, relationships and social systems. Increasingly, psychologists are including a focus on treatment which recognizes a person’s strengths, talents, and abilities comparably with their mental weaknesses and inadequacies. 2. Scientific Approach Research has greatly increased in scope and construct, creating a wide array of experimentation. According to Positive Psychology UK (2013), the goal of positive psychology â€Å"is to bring solid empirical research in areas such as well-being, flow, personal strengths, wisdom, creativity, psychological health, and characteristics of positive groups and institutions.† The research of positive psychology is produced on three principle levels – the individual level, the subjective level, and the group level. The focus of the subjective level is mainly concerned with the measurement of positive experiences such as well-being, happiness, optimism, flow, and joy. At the individual level, the objective is to identify and measure positive human traits and qualities which demonstrate a ‘life of quality’, as, for example, necessary attributes of a ‘good person’. The group level emphasizes the macro-scale of social paradigms.Show MoreRelatedPersonal Theory Paper4363 Words   |  18 PagesSpirituality in Counseling Lynn C. Ball Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary May 8, 2015 Abstract I stumbled through the first thirty-eight years of life attempting to mask the hurts caused by myself and others. I was my own worst critic fueled by raging addictions and chaos; searching to find a perfection that could never be achieved. Life was a hurricane of madness and at the center of that storm was the Father waiting for me to give Him my whole heart. The purpose of this paperRead MoreEffects of Computer Games in Students3968 Words   |  16 PagesThe first reason that teenagers play computer games too much is very simple, because computer games are very fun. Computer games’ aims focus on to relieve stress. Therefore, computer games are very splendid violent content. There has long been the brief that violent content may teach violent behavior† â€Å"Mind and Media†. Moreover, Barrie Gunter asserted, â€Å"Extrapolating †¦ from playing computer or video games with violent themes, such as heightening of perceptions risk or danger in the real world,â €  â€Å"TheRead MoreThe Importance of Demography to Development11868 Words   |  48 Pagesboth qualitative and quantitative methods, including case studies, survey research, statistical analysis, and model building among others. History of Sociology Sociology is a relatively new academic discipline among other social sciences including economics, political science, anthropology, history, and psychology. The ideas behind it, however, have a long history and can trace their origins to a mixture of common human knowledge and philosophy. 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Logical analysis to evaluate the principle for it integrity. 4. Critical role in the 20th century postmodern cultural movement with reference to culture, language and social justice. 5. Positive role in contemporary global politics to bring tolerance, harmony and peace in very complex multicultural world in order to solve disputes among different countries and nations. Finally It is together different ideas related to cultural relativismRead MoreMultiple Intelligences Seminar and Workshop14464 Words   |  58 PagesI.)? 2. How does this theory differ from the traditional definition of intelligence? 3. What do multiple intelligences have to do with my classroom? 4. How has M.I. theory developed since it was introduced in 1983? 5. Who are the critics of this theory and what do they say? 6. What are some benefits of using the multiple intelligences approach in my school? 7. How can applying M.I. theory help students learn better? 8. How can I find out more about M.I. theory? 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Tuesday, December 24, 2019

Symptoms And Symptoms Of Bipolar Disorder - 1174 Words

Have you ever thought that everyone around you was bipolar? Is there a person around you who constantly says that just about everyone around you is bipolar? Or perhaps you thought that you yourself could possibly be bipolar. If that was, or is you, then you have probably been wondering what bipolar disorder is. If so, then take a look at the definition of bipolar disorder by the signs and symptoms, what causes it, and what treatment there is for it. The signs and symptoms of bipolar disorder are unique to each individual classified as bipolar. Yet they have a set of basic symptoms, which include mania; depression; a mood disturbance that is bad enough to require hospitalization to prevent harm to others or one’s self or there are psychotic†¦show more content†¦It usually starts when you are a teenager, although it has been known to start later in life. Some experts have discovered that the initial episodes of depression or hyperactivity in adolescents are later changed to a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. It is curious that family and friends are usually more comfortable dealing with the depressed stage of bipolar than the manic or hypomanic stages. The reason for this is that the person who is in a manic or hypomanic state can be very unpredictable and rather scary. There are people who while in a manic state can be very charismatic and fascinating to be around. It is these people who do not realize that they hav e a disease and will refuse treatment because they do not want to interrupt the flow of the creative juices. As they say in the New Hope for People with Bipolar Disorder, â€Å"The diagnosis of bipolar disorder is largely based on the history of prior behaviors, thought patterns, and moods, as well as family history of mood disorders† (Fawcett, Golden, and Rosenfeld 34). Thus it is vital for the doctor to get this information from the patient to properly diagnosis them. How do you know you have bipolar disorder and what causes bipolar disorder? It is a combination of a chemical reaction in the brain and heredity. Heredity means that your mom, or your dad or even your grandma or grandpa or possibly any combination of the above group or

Monday, December 16, 2019

Economic Interdependence Free Essays

string(239) " notion of economic interdependence, fusing the liberal insight that the benefits of trade give states an incentive to avoid war with the realist view that the potential costs of being cut off can push states to war to secure vital goods\." Economic Interdependence and War: A Theory of Trade Expectations Author(s): Dale C. Copeland Source: International Security, Vol. 20, No. We will write a custom essay sample on Economic Interdependence or any similar topic only for you Order Now 4 (Spring, 1996), pp. 5-41 Published by: The MIT Press Stable URL: http://www. jstor. org/stable/2539041 Accessed: 12/10/2010 13:07 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR’s Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www. jstor. org/page/info/about/policies/terms. jsp. JSTOR’s Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use. Please contact the publisher regarding any further use of this work. Publisher contact information may be obtained at http://www. jstor. org/action/showPublisher? publisherCode=mitpress. Each copy of any part of a JSTOR transmission must contain the same copyright notice that appears on the screen or printed page of such transmission. JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor. org. The MIT Press is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to International Security. http://www. jstor. org Economic DaleC. Copeland Interdependence and War A Theory of Trade Expectations Does economic inter- dependence increase or decrease the probability of war among states? With the Cold War over, this question is taking on importance as trade levels between established powers such as the United States and Russia and emerging powers such as Japan, China, and Western Europe grow to new heights. In this article, I provide a new dynamic theory to help overcome some of the theoretical and empirical problems with current liberal and realist views on the question. The prolonged debate between realists and liberals on the causes of war has been largely a debate about the relative salience of different causal variables. Realists stress such factors as relative power, while liberals focus on the absence or presence of collective security regimes and the pervasiveness of democratic communities. Economic interdependence is the only factor that plays an important causal role in the thinking of both camps, and their perspectives are diametrically opposed. Liberals argue that economic interdependence lowers the likelihood of war by increasing the value of trading over the alternative of aggression: interdependent states would rather trade than invade. As long as high levels of Dale C. Copelands AssistantProfessorn the Department f Governmentnd ForeignAffairsat the i i o a University f V irginia. o For their helpful comments on previous drafts of this article, I would like to thank Robert Art, V. Natasha Copeland, Michael Desch, Angela Doll, John Duffield, Matthew Evangelista, Richard Falkenrath, James Fearon, Joseph Grieco, Atsushi Ishida, Irving Lachow, Alastair lain Johnston, Andrew Kydd, Jack Levy, Lisa Martin, Michael Mastanduno, John Mearsheimer, Andrew Moravcsik, John Owen, Paul Papayoanou, Stephen Rhoads, Gideon Rose, Richard Rosecrance, Len Schoppa, Herman Schwartz, Randall Schweller, Jitsuo Tsuchiyama, David Waldner, and Stephen Walt. This article also benefited from presentations at the Program on International Politics, Economics, and Security at the University of Chicago; the University of Virginia Department of Government’s faculty workshop; the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago, September 1995; the Olin security workshop at the Center for International Affairs, Harvard University; and the Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University (under whose auspices it was written). All errors remain mine. 1. For a summary of the causal variables in the two schools, see John J. Mearsheimer, â€Å"Back to the Future: Instability in Europe After the Cold War,†InternationalSecurity, Vol. 15, No. 1 (Summer 1990), pp. 5-56; Robert 0. Keohane, â€Å"International Liberalism Reconsidered,† in John Dunn, ed. , The EconomicLimits to ModernPolitics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990), pp. 165-194. InternationalSecurity, Vol. 20, No. 4 (Spring 1996), pp. 5-41 ? 1996 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology InternationalSecurity 20:4 | 6 interdependence can be maintained, liberals assert, we have reason for optimism. Realists dismiss the liberal argument, arguing that high interdependence increases rather than decreases the probability of war. In anarchy, states must constantly worry about their security. Accordingly, interdependence-meaning mutual dependence and thus vulnerability-gives states an incentive to initiate war, if only to ensure continued access to necessary materials and goods. The unsatisfactory nature of both liberal and realist theories is shown by their difficulties in explaining the run-ups to the two World Wars. The period up to World War I exposes a glaring anomaly for liberal theory: the European powers had reached unprecedented levels of trade, yet that did not prevent them from going to war. Realists certainly have the correlation right-the war was preceded by high interdependence-but trade levels had been high for the previous thirty years; hence, even if interdependence was a necessary condition for the war, it was not sufficient. At first glance, the period from 1920 to 1940 seems to support liberalism over realism. In the 1920s, interdependence was high, and the world was essentially peaceful; in the 1930s, as entrenched protectionism caused interdependence to fall, international tension rose to the point of world war. Yet the two most aggressive states in the system during the 1930s, Germany and Japan, were also the most highly dependent despite their efforts towards autarchy, relying on other states, including other great powers, for critical raw materials. Realism thus seems correct in arguing that high dependence may lead to conflict, as states use war to ensure access to vital goods. Realism’s problem with the interwar era, however, is that Germany and Japan had been even more dependent in the 1920s, yet they sought war only in the late 1930s when their dependence, although still significant, had fallen. The theory presented in this article-the theory of trade expectations-helps to resolve these problems. The theory starts by clarifying the notion of economic interdependence, fusing the liberal insight that the benefits of trade give states an incentive to avoid war with the realist view that the potential costs of being cut off can push states to war to secure vital goods. You read "Economic Interdependence" in category "Essay examples" The total of the benefits and potential costs of trade versus autarchy reveals the true level of dependence a state faces, for if trade is completely severed, the state not only loses the gains from trade but also suffers the costs of adjusting its economy to the new situation. Trade expectations theory introduces a new causal variable, the expectations of future trade, examining its impact on the overall expected value of the trading option if a state decides to forgo war. This supplements the static Economicnterdependence War| 7 and I consideration in liberalism and realism of the levels of interdependence at any point in time, with the importance of leaders’ dynamic expectations into the future. Levels of interdependence and expectations of future trade, considered simultaneously, lead to new predictions. Interdependence can foster peace, as liberals argue, but this will only be so when states expect that trade levels will be high into the foreseeable future. If highly interdependent states expect that trade will be severely restricted-that is, if their expectations for future trade are low-realists are likely to be right: the most highly dependent states will be the ones most likely to initiate war, for fear of losing the economic wealth that supports their long-term security. In short, high interdependence can be either peace-inducing or war-inducing, depending on the expectations of future trade. This dynamic perspective helps bridge the gaps within and between current approaches. Separating levels of interdependence from expectations of future trade indicates that states may be pushed into war even if current trade levels are high, if leaders have good reason to suspect that others will cut them off in the future. In such a situation, the expected value of trade will likely be negative, and hence the value of continued peace is also negative, making war an attractive alternative. This insight helps resolve the liberal problem with World War I: despite high trade levels in 1913-14, declining expectations for future trade pushed German leaders to attack, to ensure long-term access to markets and raw materials. Even when current trade is low or non-existent, positive expectations for future trade will produce a positive expected value for trade, and therefore an incentive for continued peace. This helps explain the two main periods of detente between the Cold War superpowers, from 1971 to 1973 and in the late 1980s: positive signs from U. S. eaders that trade would soon be significantly increased coaxed the Soviets into a more cooperative relationship, reducing the probability of war. But in situations of low trade where there is no prospect that high trade levels will be restored in the future, highly dependent states may be pushed into conflict. This was the German and Japanese dilemma before World War II. The article is divided into three sections. The first section reviews liberal and realist theories on the relationship between economic interdependence and the probability of war, and provides a critique of both theories. The second section lays out trade expectations theory The final section examines the diplomatic historical evidence for the new theory against two significant cases: Germany Internationalecurity20:4 | 8 S before World War I and Germany before World War II. The evidence indicates that the new variable, expectations of future trade, helps resolve the anomalies for current theories: in both cases, negative expectations for future trade, combined with high dependence, led leaders into total war out of fear for their long-term economic position and therefore security. TheLiberal nd RealistDebateon Economic nterdependence a I War and The core liberal position is straightforward. 2 Trade provides valuable benefits, or â€Å"gains from trade,† to any particular state. A dependent state should therefore seek to avoid war, since peaceful trading gives it all the benefits of close ties without any of the costs and risks of war. Trade pays more than war, so dependent states should prefer to trade not invade. This argument is often supported by the auxiliary proposition that modern technology greatly increases the costs and risks of aggression, making the trading option even more rational. The argument was first made popular in the 1850s by Richard Cobden, who asserted that free trade â€Å"unites† states, â€Å"making each equally anxious for the prosperity and happiness of both. â€Å"3 This view was restated in The GreatIllusion by Norman Angell just prior to World War I and again in 1933. Angell saw states having to choose between new ways of thinking, namely peaceful trade, and the â€Å"old method† of power politics. Even if war was once profitable, modernization now makes it impossible to â€Å"enrich† oneself through force; indeed, by destroying trading bonds, war is â€Å"commercially suicidal. 4 Why do wars nevertheless occur? While the start of World War I just after The GreatIllusion’s initial publication might seem to refute his thesis, Angell in 2. Four other subsidiary liberal arguments, employing intervening variables, are not sufficiently compelling to discuss here. The first suggests that high trade levels promote domest ic prosperity, thereby lessening the internal problems that push leaders into war. The second argues that interdependence helps to foster increased understanding between peoples, which reduces the misunderstandings that lead to war. The third asserts that trade alters the domestic structure of states, heightening the influence of groups with a vested interest in peaceful trade. The final argument contends that trade has the â€Å"spill-over† effect of increasing political ties between trading partners, thus improving the prospects for long-term cooperation. For an critical analysis of these views, see Dale Copeland, â€Å"Economic Interdependence and the Outbreak of War,†paper presented to University of Virginia Department of Government’s faculty workshop, March 1995. 3. Richard Cobden, The Political Writings of Richard Cobden (London: T. Fischer Unwin, 1903), p. 225. 4. Norman Angell, The GreatIllusion, 2d ed. (New York: G. P Putnam’s Sons, 1933), pp. 33, 59-60, 87-89. Economicnterdependence WarI 9 I and the 1933 edition argued that the debacle simply confirmed the unprofitability of modern wars. He thus upheld the common liberal view that wars, especially major wars, result from the misperceptions of leaders caught up in the outmoded belief that war still pays. Accordingly, his is â€Å"not a plea for the impossibility of war †¦ but for its futility,† since â€Å"our ignorance on this matter makes war not only possible, but extremely likely. 5 In short, if leaders fail to see how unprofitable war is compared to the benefits of trade, they may still erroneously choose the former. Richard Rosecrance provides the most extensive update of the CobdenAngell thesis to the nuclear era. States must choose between being â€Å"trading states,† concerned with promoting wealth through commerce, and â⠂¬Å"territorial states,† obsessed with military expansion. Modern conditions push states towards a predominantly trading mode: wars are not only too costly, but with the peaceful trading option, â€Å"the benefits that one nation gains from trade can also be realized by others. When the system is highly interdependent, therefore, the â€Å"incentive to wage war is absent,† since â€Å"trading states recognize that they can do better through internal economic development sustained by a worldwide market for their goods and services than by trying to conquer and assimilate large tracts of land. â€Å"6 Rosecrance thus neatly summarizes the liberal view that high interdependence fosters peace by making trading more profitable than invading. 7 5. Ibid. , pp. 59-62, 256. i S a 6. RichardRosecrance,TheRise of the Trading tate:Commercend Conquestn the ModernWorld (New York: Basic Books, 1986), pp. 3-14; 24-25 (emphasis added); see also Rosecrance, â€Å"War, a Trade and Int erdependence,† in James N. Rosenau and Hylke Tromp, eds. , Interdependence nd Conflict in WorldPolitics (Aldershot, U. K. : Avebury, 1989), pp. 48-57; Rosecrance, â€Å"A New Concert of Powers,† Foreign Affairs, Vol. 71, No. 2 (Spring 1992), pp. 64-82. 7. A book often seen as a statement on the peace-inducing effects of interdependence-Robert 0. Keohane and Joseph S. Nye, Power and Interdependence(Boston: Little, Brown, 1977)-actually contains no such causal argument. For Keohane and Nye, â€Å"complex interdependence† is more peaceful by definition: it is a valuable concept for analyzing the political process† only when military force is â€Å"unthinkable† (pp. 29, 24). In the second edition: â€Å"since we define complex interdependence in terms of [policy] goals and instruments,† arguments â€Å"about how goals and instruments are affected by the degree to which a situation approximates complex interdependence or realism will be tautologic al. † Thus, â€Å"we are left essentially with two dependent variables: changes in agendas and changes in the roles of international organizations. † Keohane and Nye, Power and Interdependence, d ed. (Glenview, Ill. Scott, Foresman, 1989), p. 255; emphasis in original. 2 The dependent variable of this article-the likelihood of war-is nowhere to be found, which is not surprising, since it is assumed away. Other works on interdependence from the 1970s, which largely examined dependent variables other than war, are discussed in Copeland, â€Å"Economic Interdependence and the Outbreak of War. † InternationalSecurity 20:4 | 10 Realists turn the liberal argument on its head, arguing that economic interdependence not only fails to promote peace, but in fact heightens the likelihood of war. States concerned about security will dislike dependence, since it means that crucial imported goods could be cut off during a crisis. This problem is particularly acute for imports l ike oil and raw materials; while they may be only a small percentage of the total import bill, without them most modern economies would collapse. Consequently, states dependent on others for vital goods have an increased incentive to go to war to assure themselves of continued access of supply. Neorealist Kenneth Waltz puts the argument as follows: actors within a domestic polity have little reason to fear the dependence that goes with specialization. The anarchic structure of international politics, however, makes states worry about their vulnerability, thus compelling them â€Å"to control what they depend on or to lessen the extent of their dependency. † For Waltz, it is this â€Å"simple thought† that explains, among other things, â€Å"their imperial thrusts to widen the scope of their control. â€Å"9 For John Mearsheimer, nations that â€Å"depend on others for critical economic supplies will fear cutoff or blackmail in time of crisis or war. † Consequently, â€Å"they may try to extend political control to the source of supply, giving rise to conflict with the source or with its other customers. Interdependence, therefore, â€Å"will probably lead to greater security competition. â€Å"10 8. One might contend that realists doubt the causal importance of economic interdependence, since relative gains concerns convince great powers to avoid becoming dependent in the first place. Aside from arguments showing why states may cooperate despite concerns for relative gains (see essays by Powell, Snidal, and Keohane in David A. Baldwin, ed. , Neorealismand Neoliberalism:The Contemporary ebate [New York: Columbia University Press, 1993]; Dale Copeland, â€Å"Why Relative D Gains Concerns May Promote Economic Cooperation: A Realist Explanation for Great Power Interdependence,† presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, San Diego, April 1996), the argument is empirically false. Periods of high interdependence have arisen even when the security competition between great powers was particularly intense, such as from 1880 to 1914, as Waltz acknowledges. Kenneth Waltz, â€Å"The Myth of Interdependence,† in Ray Maghoori and Bennett Ramberg, Globalism versus Realism (Boulder, Colo. : Westview Press, 1982), p. 83. Since the reality of high interdependence cannot be argued or assumed away, I focus here on the core realist claim that whenever high levels of interdependence are reached, for whatever reason, war is more likely. 9. Kenneth Waltz, Theory of InternationalPolitics (New York: Random House, 1979), p. 106. 10. John J. Mearsheimer, â€Å"Disorder Restored,† in Graham Allison and Gregory F Treverton, eds. , Rethinking America’s Security (New York: W. W. Norton, 1992), p. 223; Mearsheimer, â€Å"Back to the Future,† p. 45. See also Robert Gilpin, â€Å"Economic Interdependence and National Security in Historical Perspective,† in Klaus Knorr and Frank N. Trager, eds. , Economic Issues and National Security (Lawrence, Kan. : Allen, 1977), p. 29. Adopting the realist argument, but emphasizing how dependence leads states to adopt destabilizing offensive strategies, is Anne Uchitel, â€Å"Interdepend- Economicnterdependence War| 11 and I This modern realist understanding of economic interdependence and war finds its roots in mercantilist writings dating from the seventeenth century Mercantilists saw states as locked in a competition for relative power and for the wealth that underpins that power. For mercantilists, imperial expansionthe acquisition of colonies-is driven by the state’s need to secure greater control over sources of supply and markets for its goods, and to build relative power in the process. By allowing the metropole and the colonies to specialize in production and trade of complementary products (particularly manufactured goods for raw materials), while ensuring political control over the process, colonies  "opened up the possibility of providing a system of supply within a self-contained empire. â€Å"‘2 In this, we see the underpinning for the neorealist view that interdependence leads to war. Mercantilist imperialism represents a reaction to a state’s dependence; states reduce their fears of external specialization by increasing internal specialization within a now larger political realm. The imperial state as it expands thus acquires more and more of the characteristics of Waltz’s domestic polity, with its hierarchy of specialized functions secure from the unpredictable policies of others. In sum, realists seek to emphasize one main point: political concerns driven by anarchy must be injected into the liberal calculus. Since states must be primarily concerned with security and therefore with control over resources and markets, one must discount the liberal optimism that great trading partners will always continue to be great trading partners simply because both states benefit absolutely. Accordingly, a state vulnerable to another’s policies because of dependence will tend to use force to overcome that vulnerability. ence and Instability,† in Jack Snyder and Robert Jervis, eds. , Coping with Complexityin the International System (Boulder, Colo. : Westview Press, 1993), pp. 43-264. For Barry Buzan, since liberal free-trading systems are dependent on a hegemon which invariably declines, such systems are destined to fall into â€Å"malevolent† mercantilist practices, as states scramble to control access to goods formerly safeguarded by the hegemon. Avoiding the liberal system altogether, through a â€Å"benign† mercantilist system of self-sufficient trading blocs, will be the refore preferred. Buzan, â€Å"Economic Structure and International Security: The Limits of the Liberal Case,† International Organization, Vol. 8, No. 4 (Autumn 1984), esp. pp. 597, 609-623. For a similar argument, see Robert Gilpin, U. S. Power and the Multinational Corporation(New York: Basic Books), 1975, p. 259. 11. See Eli F Heckscher, Mercantilism, vol. 2, trans. Mendel Shapiro (London: George Allen, 1931), p. 15; Jacob Viner, â€Å"Power Versus Plenty as Objectives of Foreign Policy in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries,† World Politics, Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 1948), p. 10; David A. Baldwin, Economic Statecraft(Princeton, N. J. : Princeton University Press, 1985), chap. . 12. Heckscher, Mercantilism, vol. 2, p. 40. InternationalSecurity 20:4 | 12 A COMPARISON OF THE LIBERAL AND REALIST PERSPECTIVES While the liberal and the realist arguments display critical differences, they possess one important similarity: the causal logic of both perspectives is founde d on an individual state’s decision-making process. That is, while the two camps freely use the term â€Å"interdependence,† both derive predictions from with their own specific how particular decision-making units-states-deal dependence. This allows both theories to handle situations of â€Å"asymmetric interdependence,† where one state in a dyad is more dependent than the other. Their predictions are internally consistent, but opposed: liberals argue that the more dependent state is less likely to initiate conflict, since it has more to lose from breaking economic ties;13 realists maintain that this state is more likely to initiate conflict, to escape its vulnerability. The main difference between liberals and realists has to do with their emphasis on the benefits versus the costs of interdependence. The realist argument highlights an aspect that is severely downplayed in the liberal argument, namely, consideration of the potential costs from the severing of a trading relationship. Most liberals, if pressed, would probably accept David Baldwin’s conceptualization of dependence as the opportunity costs a state would experience should trade end. Yet Baldwin’s opportunity costs are only the loss of the benefits from trade received after a state moves from autarchy. 14 It is this understanding of opportunity costs that is followed in the most comprehensive liberal argument for interdependence and peace, that of Rosecrance. There is little sense in Rosecrance’s work that a state’s decision to specialize and thus to restructure its economy radically can entail huge â€Å"costs of adjustment† should trade be later severed, nor that such costs can actually put the state in a far worse position than if it had never moved from autarchy in the first place. 15 This is the concern of realists when they talk about dependence on 13. See Keohane and Nye, â€Å"World Politics and the International Economic System,† in C. Fred Bergsten, ed. , The Future of the InternationalEconomicOrder (Lexington: D. C. Heath, 1973), pp. 121122; Neil R. Richardson and Charles W. Kegley, â€Å"Trade Dependence and Foreign Policy Compliance,† International Studies Quarterly,Vol. 24, No. 2 (June 1980), pp. 191-222. 14. David A. Baldwin, â€Å"Interdependence and Power: A Conceptual Analysis,† International Organization, Vol. 34, No. 4 (Autumn 1980), pp. 478, 482-484, 489; Baldwin, â€Å"The Power of Positive Sanctions,† WorldPolitics, Vol. 24, No. 1 (October 1971), pp. 19-38; Albert 0. Hirschman, National Power and the Structure of Foreign Trade,exp. ed. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980), chap. . 15. On the costs of adjustment, see Ruth Arad, Seev Hirsch, and Alfred Tovias, The Economicsof Peacemaking(New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1983), pp. 26-34. Keohane and Nye examine the â€Å"costs of adjusting† as an integral part of â€Å"vulnerability† interdependence (Power and Interdependence, p. 13). Yet they do not establish the original autarchic po sition as a baseline for examining these costs independently from the benefits of trade forgone; this baseline is incorporated later in EconomicInterdependence nd War | 13 a â€Å"vital goods† such as oil. A state that chooses not to buy oil from outsiders forgoes certain benefits of trade, but by operating on domestic energy sources, it avoids the heavy penalty experienced by a state that does base its industrial structure on imported oil, only to find itself cut off from supplies. That Rosecrance minimizes this realist concern is evident. In an explicit effort to refute Waltz’s definition of interdependence as â€Å"a trading link which ‘is costly to break’,† Rosecrance contends that â€Å"to measure interdependence in this way misses the essence of the concept. His subsequent discussion emphasizes only the benefits that states give up if they choose not to trade (his â€Å"opportunity costs†), and makes no mention of any potentially severe costs of adjustment. In fact, he argues that dependence on such things as foreign sources of energy is really no different than relying on outsiders for â€Å"fashions† or different makes of cars; if trade is cut off, a state loses only â€Å"consumer choice. † Recognition that the whole industrial structure of a state might be undermined or destroyed by an adversary’s severing of vital trade is absent. 6 Rosecrance is reluctant to acknowledge realist concerns, perhaps because to do so would imply that dependent states might be more willing to go to war, as realists maintain, while Rosecrance is arguing that they are less willing to do so. 17 This points to a critical distinction between liberalism and realism that illuminates the liberal understanding of why wars ultimately occur. For liberals, interdependence does not have a downside that might push states into war, as realists contend. Rather, interdependence is seen to operate as a restraint on aggressive tendencies arising from the domestic or individual levels. If interdependence becomes low, this restraint is taken away, allowing the aggressive tendencies to dominate. To borrow a metaphor from Plato: for liberals, inter- building the new theory. Liberals also consider â€Å"costs† in terms of losses in â€Å"autonomy† due to trade ties; see Richard N. Cooper, The Economicsof Interdependence New York:McGraw Hill, 1968), ( pp. 4-12; Rosecrance, Rise of the TradingState, pp. 39-41, 235. Note, however, that these are costs that go hand in hand with high trade, not costs that are experienced if trade is cut off. Hence, these losses in autonomy are more accurately considered as a form of sensitivity interdependencecosts incurred when trade is ongoing-rather than as a form of â€Å"vulnerability† interdependence so worrying to realists. On this, see Keohane and Nye, â€Å"International Interdependence and Integration,† in Fred I. Greenstein and Nelson W. Polsby, eds. , Handbook of Political Science, vol. 8 (Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley, 1975), pp. 368-370. 16. Rosecrance, Rise of the Trading State, pp. 144-145. In the appendix, an iterated prisoner’s dilemma is used to show the â€Å"concrete benefits† from trade cooperation. If states decide not to cooperate, they simply â€Å"[do] not benefit†; pp. 233-236. 17. Rosecrance occasionally seems to accept that some goods are more vital than others, but even here he reiterates the liberal argument: â€Å"Countries dependent on the world economy for markets, assistance, and critical raw materials are doubly hesitant to embark on military adventures†; ibid. , p. 133, emphasis added. InternationalSecurity 20:4 | 14 dependence operates like the reins on the dark horse of inner passions; it provides a material incentive to stay at peace, even when there are internal predispositions towards aggression. Remove the reins, however, and these passions are free to roam as they will. 18 This point becomes clearer as one examines Rosecrance’s explanations for the two World Wars. World War II, for Rosecrance, was ultimately domestically driven. The main aggressors saw war as a means to cope with the upheavals flowing from â€Å"social discontent and chaos† and the â€Å"danger of left-wing revolutions†; given these upheavals, it is â€Å"not surprising that the territorial and military-political system [i. e. , war] emerged as an acceptable alternative to more than one state. Connecting the Second World War to causes arising from the unit level in the First World War,he continues: â€Å"If Germany, Italy, and Japan did not fulfill their territorial ambitions at the end of World War I, they might develop even more nationalistic and solidaristic regimes and try again. â€Å"19With trade and therefore interdependence at low levels in the 1930s, â€Å"economics offered no alternative possibility†; it failed to provide what he later refers to as a â€Å"mitigat[ing]† or â€Å"restraining† influence on unit-level motives for war. 0 World War I is a problematic case for Rosecrance, as it was for Angell, since the great powers went to war even though trade levels were still high. Like Angell, Rosecrance’s main defense of liberalism is that leaders simply did not see how beneficial interdependence was, and how costly war would be. Due to outmoded ideas and unit-level pathologies, they misperceived the situation; hence, interdependence could not operate as it should, as a restraint on aggression. He talks about leaders’ obsession with â€Å"nationalist ambitions† and â€Å"balance of power politics. He suggests that â€Å"no pre-1914 statesman or financier was fully aware of the damage that war would do to the European body economic† because of the irrational belief that â€Å"[war] would be over very 1 8. See Plato’s Phaedrus in Phaedrus and Letters VII and VIII, trans. Walter Hamilton (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1973), sections 246-256. The historical roots of this view are explicated in f b i P Albert 0. Hirschman,The Passionsand the Interests: oliticalArgumentsor Capitalism efore ts Triumph(Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1977). He quotes Montesquieu (ibid. , p. 73): â€Å"It is fortunate for men to be in a situation in which, though their passions may prompt them to be wicked, they have nevertheless an interest in not being so. † 19. Rosecrance, Rise of the TradingState, pp. 102-103 (see also p. 111). Rosecrance does point out that Germany and Japan apparently went to war also to gain raw materials (ibid. , p. 108). He does not argue, however, that these two states were more dependent than other states for such materials; to have done so would suggest the validity of the realist logic. 0. See ibid. , pp. 106, 123, 150, 162. EconomicInterdependence nd War | 15 a quickly. â€Å"21At one point, he even seems to cast doubt on the efficacy of interdependence as a restraint on aggression: One should not place too much emphasis upon the existence of interdependence per se. European nations in 1913 relied upon the trade and investment that flowed between them; that did not prevent the political crisis which led to †¦ World War I. Interdependence only constrains national policy if leaders accept and agree to work within its limits. 22 It thus appears that Rosecrance cannot really envision interdependence as being anything but a â€Å"constraint† or â€Å"restraint† on unit-level tendencies to aggress. This view is consistent with the general liberal perspective that all wars are ultimately driven by unit-level phenomena such as misperceptions, authoritarianism, ideology, and internal social conflict. Rosecrance’s historical understanding of the World War II, for example, would fit nicely with the â€Å"democratic peace† literature: had all the states in 1939 been democratic, war would probably ot have occurred despite the disrupted global economic situation, but since some states were not democratic, their aggressive domestic forces became unfettered once interdependence had declined. The idea that economic factors by themselves can push states to aggress-an argument consistent with neorealism and the alternative theory I will present below-is outside the realm of liberal thought, since it would imply that purely systemic forces can be responsible for war, largely regardless of unit-level phenomena. 3 While liberal theory certainly downplays the realist concern for the potential costs of severed trade, it is also clear that realists slight the positive role the benefits of trade can have on a state’s choice between peace and war. In the next section, I bring together the liberal emphasis on benefits with the realist emphasis on costs to create a framework for understanding the true level of dependence a state faces. This section also seeks to correct the most significant 21. See ibid. , pp. 18-19, 88, 96-97, 99, 150. 22. Ibid. , p. 141 (see also p. 150). The argument here borders on being non-falsifiable: disconfirming cases where war occurs despite high interdependence can be sidestepped by saying simply that states did not â€Å"accept† being peaceful traders. Note as well that if states have already decided to be peaceful, then interdependence is not needed as a restraint. 23. On liberalism’s inherently unit-level orientation to conflict, see Andrew Moravcsik, â€Å"Liberalism and International Relations Theory,† Working Paper, Center for International Affairs, Harvard University, 1992; Michael Howard, War and the LiberalConscience (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1978). On the democratic peace argument, see Bruce Russett, Grasping the Democratic Peace (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993). InternationalSecurity 20:4 | 16 error in both liberal and realist theories, namely, their lack of theoretical attention to the dynamics of state expectations for the future. o Trade r Invade? A Theory f Trade xpectations E o This section introduces the theory of trade expectations. This theory extends liberal and realist views regarding interdependence and war, by synthesizing their strengths while formulating a dynamic perspective on state decision-making that is at best only implicit in current approaches. The strength of liberalism lies in its consideration of how the benefits or gains from trade give states a material incentive to avoid war, even when they have unit-level predispositions to favor it. The strength of realism is its recognition that states may be vulnerable to the potential costs of being cut off from trade on which they depend for wealth and ultimately security. Current theories, however, lack a way to fuse the benefits of trade and the costs of severed trade into one theoretical framework. More significantly, these theories lack an understanding of how rational decision-makers incorporate the future trading environment into their choice between peace and war. Both liberalism and realism often refer to the future trading environment, particularly in empirical analyses. But in constructing a theoretical logic, the two camps consider the future only within their own ideological presuppositions. Liberals, assuming that states seek to maximize absolute welfare, maintain that situations of high trade should continue into the foreseeable future as long as states are rational; such actors have no reason to forsake the benefits from trade, especially if defection from the trading arrangement will only lead to retaliation. 24 Given this presupposition, liberals can argue that interdependence-as reflected in high trade at any particular moment in time-will foster peace, given the benefits of trade over war. Realists, assuming states seek to maximize security, argue that concerns for relative power and autonomy will eventually push some states to sever trade ties (at least in the absence of a hegemon). Hence, realists can insist that interdependence, again manifest as high trade at any moment in time, drives dependent states to initiate war now to escape potential vulnerability later. For the purposes of forging strong theories, however, trading patterns cannot be simply assumed a priori to match the stipulations of either liberalism or of realism. Trade levels fluctuate significantly over time, both for the system as a 24. See Rosecrance, Rise of the TradingState, appendix. EconomicInterdependence nd War | 17 a whole and particularly between specific trading partners, as the last two centuries demonstrate. Accordingly, we need a theory that incorporates how a state’s expectations of its trading environment-either optimistic or pessimistic-affect its decision-calculus for war or peace. This is where the new theory makes its most significant departure. Liberalism and realism are theories of â€Å"comparative statics,† drawing predictions from a snapshot of the level of interdependence at a single point in time. The new theory, on the other hand, is dynamic in its internal structure: it provides a new variable, the â€Å"expectations of future trade,† that incorporates in the theoretical logic an actor’s sense of the future trends and possibilities. 25 This variable is essential to any leader’s determination not just of the immediate value of peace versus war at a particular moment in time, but of the overall expected value of peace and war over the foreseeable future. From consideration of the expectations-of-future-trade variable along with a state’s level of dependence, one can derive a consistent deductive theory of state decision-making showing the conditions under which high interdependence will lead to peace or to war. High interdependence can be peace-inducing, as liberals maintain, as long as states expect future trade levels to be high in the future: positive expectations for future trade will lead dependent states to assign a high expected value to a continuation of peaceful trade, making war the less appealing option. If, however, a highly dependent state expects future trade to be low due to the policy decisions of the other side, then realists are likely to be correct: the state will attach a low or even negative expected value to continued peace without trade, making war an attractive alternative if its expected value is greater than peace. Moreover, since a negative expected value of trade implies a long-term decline in power, even if war is not profitable per se, it may be chosen as the lesser of two evils. 26 5. On the differences between comparative statics and dynamic analyses that incorporate the future, see Eugene Silberberg, The Structure of Economics, 2d ed. (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1990), chaps. 1, 12, and 18. 26. That is, war is rational if it has either a higher net positive value or a lower net negative value. The theory thus works regardless of whether states are innately â€Å"greedy†-seeking positive gains from war-or simply security-seekers desiring to minimize long-term threats. See Charles L. Glaser, â€Å"Political Consequences of Military Strategy: Expanding and Refining the Spiral and Deterrence Models,† WorldPolitics, Vol. 44, No. 4 (July 1992), pp. 497-538. By connecting the trading environment to fears about relative decline, I draw upon the notion that declining states launch preventive wars to uphold their waning security. Elsewhere, I build a solely power-driven theory showing why states faced with deep and inevitable decline initiate major wars. Dale Copeland, â€Å"Neorealism and the Myth of Bipolar Stability: Toward a New Dynamic Realist Theory of Major War,† Security Studies, Vol. , No. 3 (Spring 1996). S 2 International ecurity 0:4 | 18 The deductive logic of the alternative theory, as with liberalism and realism, centers on an individual state’s efforts to manage its own situation of dependence. Consider a two-actor scenario, where one state â€Å"A† may trade with another state â€Å"B. † If state A moves away from the in itial position of autarchy to begin trading, and trade is free and open, it will expect to receive the benefits of trade stressed by liberals, namely, the incremental increase in A’s total welfare due to trade. 7 Note that a state can still be aware of the â€Å"benefits of trade† even if present trade is non-existent, since they represent the potential gains from trade that would accrue to the state should trade levels become high in the future. 28It is a state’s ability to foresee future potential benefits that allows it to attach a high expected value to the peaceful trading option even when current trade levels are low (as long as it expects current restrictions to be relaxed). When a state trades, it specializes in and exports goods in which it enjoys a comparative advantage, while forgoing the production of other goods, which it then imports. This process of specialization, however, entails potentially large costs of adjustment if trade is subsequently cut off. This is especially so in the modern world if the state becomes dependent on foreign oil and certain raw materials. With the economy’s capital infrastructure (machines, factories, transportation systems, etc. ) geared to function only with such vital goods, a severing of trade would impose huge costs as the economy struggles to cope with the new no-trade situation. 29 In short, the severing of trade, as realists would argue, would put the state in a situation far worse than if it had never specialized in the first place. This analysis leads to a clearer understanding of any particular state’s total level of â€Å"dependence. † On a bilateral basis, that level is represented by the sum of the benefits that the state would receive from free and open trade with another state (versus autarchy), and the costs to the state of being cut off from that trade after having specialized (versus autarchy). If state A started with an economy of 100 units of GNP before any trade with B (the autarchic position), and open trade with B would mean economic expansion to a level of 110 units of GNP on an ongoing basis, then the â€Å"benefits of trade† could be considered as 10 units. If the specialization that trade entails, however, would mean the 27. This is consistent with standard trade theory. See Richard E. Caves and Ronald W. Jones, World Tradeand Payments, 4th ed. (Boston: Little Brown, 1985), chaps. 3-4. 28. I thank Andrew Moravcsik for discussions on the potential benefits of trade. 29. The capital investments represent â€Å"sunk costs† not easily recouped. See Arad, Hirsch, and Tovias, The Economicsof Peacemaking,pp. 26-28. EconomicInterdependence nd War I 19 a conomy would fall to 85 units should B sever trade ties, then the â€Å"costs of severed trade† would be 15 units versus autarchy. State A’s total dependence level would thus be the benefits of trade plus the costs of severed trade after specialization, or 25 units. The dependence level will itself be a function of such parameters as the overall compatibilities of the two economies for trade, the degree of A’s need for vital goods such as oil and raw materials, and t he availability of alternative suppliers and markets. Thus if A’s need for trade with B is great because the economies are highly compatible (say, in terms of mutual comparative advantages), B has valuable natural resources that A lacks, and A has few other countries to turn to, then A’s dependence can be considered high. 30 In deciding between peace and war, however, a state can not refer simply to its dependence level. Rather, it must determine the overall expected value of trade and therefore the value of continued peace into the foreseeable future. The benefits of trade and the costs of severed trade on their own say nothing about this expected value. Dynamic expectations of future trade must be brought in. If the state has positive expectations that the other will maintain free and open trade over the long term, then the expected value of trade will be close to the value of the benefits of trade. On the other hand, if the state, after having specialized, comes to expect that trade will be severed by the trading partner, then the expected value of trade may be highly negative, that is, close to the value of the costs of severed trade. In essence, the expected value of trade may be anywhere between the two extremes, depending on a state’s estimate of the expected probability of securing open trade, or of being cut off. 31 This leads to a crucial hypothesis. For any given expected value of war, we can predict that the lower the expectations of future trade, the lower the 30. On the importance of altematives, see Baldwin, â€Å"Interdependence and Power,† p. 482; Keohane and Nye, Power and Interdependence, . 13. It is worth remembering that alternative suppliers p nd markets are only valuable in reducing A’s dependence if A can get access to them. If B is able not only to sever bilateral trade, but also to blockade A to prevent third-party trading, then A effectively has no alternatives and is therefore dependent. This was the situation for Japan vis-a-vis the United States before 1941 regarding oil imports. 31. This line of reasoning is developed formally in Dale Copeland, â€Å"Modelling Econo mic Interdependence and War: A Theory of Trade Expectations,† paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago, September 1995. It is consistent with consideration of the â€Å"probability of transaction† as a determinant of expected national income in Arad, Hirsch, and Tovias, The Economicof Peacemaking,pp. 37-43, although they do not employ expectations of future trade as a theoretical variable affecting the likelihood of war. InternationalSecurity 20:4 | 20 expected value of trade, and therefore the more likely it is that war will be chosen. It is important to note that the expected value of trade will not be based on the level of trade at a particular moment in time, but upon the stream of expected trade levels into the future. It really does not matter that trade is high today: if state A knows that B will cut all trade tomorrow and shows no signs of being willing to restore it later, the expected value of trade would be negative. Similarly, it does not matter if there is little or no trade at present: if state A is confident that B is committed to freer trade in the future, the expected value of trade would be positive. The fact that the expected value of trade can be negative even if present trade is high, due to low expectations for future trade, goes a long way towards resolving such manifest anomalies for liberal theory as German aggression in World War I. Despite high levels of trade up to 1914, German leaders had good reason to believe that the other great powers would undermine this trade into the future; hence, a war to secure control over raw materials and markets was required for the long-term security of the German nation. Since the expected value of trade can be positive even though present trade is low, due to high expectations for future trade, we can also understand such phenomena as the periods of detente in U. S. -Soviet relations during the Cold War (1971-73 and after 1985). While East-West trade was still relatively low during these times, the Soviet need for Western technology, combined with a growing belief that large increases in trade with the West would be forthcoming, gave the Soviets a high enough expected value of trade to convince them to be more accommodating in superpower relations. 32 In making the final decision between peace and war, however, a rational state will have to compare the expected value of trade to the expected value of going to war with the other state. The expected value of war, as a realist would emphasize, cannot be ascertained without considering the relative power balance. As one state moves from a position of relative inferiority in economic and military power to relative superiority, the expected value of war will move from negative to positive or even highly positive. This proposition follows directly from the insights of deterrence theory: the larger the state in relative size, the higher the probability of winning a victory, while the lower the costs of fighting the war. 33 32. The U. S. -Soviet Cold War case is covered in Copeland, â€Å"Modelling Economic Interdependence and War. † 33. See Alexander L. George and Richard Smoke, Deterrencein AmericanForeign Policy: Theoryand Practice (New York: Columbia University Press, 1974), chaps. 2-3. a EconomicInterdependence nd War | 21 Hence, if victory entails occupying the other state and absorbing its economy, war can take on a very positive expected value when a large power attacks a small state. 34 For example, if Iraq had been allowed to hold on to Kuwait after its August 1990 invasion, war for Iraq would certainly have â€Å"paid. † Similarly, Czechoslovakia was an easy and attractive target for Germany by 1938-39, as were the other smaller states of Europe, nd evidence suggests that war against these nations was indeed profitable for the Nazis. 35 On the other hand, war between more equal great powers is likely to have a much lower or even negative expected value. The Spartan leadership took Sparta into war against Athens in 431 BC, for example, under no illusions that war would be a profitable venture. 36 While the Athenian e conomy presented a large prize should victory be attained, war with a near-equal adversary could be expected to be very costly, with a low likelihood of victory. Where we would anticipate a low or negative expected value to the option of war, the expectations-of-future-trade variable should have a determinant effect on the likelihood of war. If state A has positive expectations for future trade with B, and A and B are roughly equal in relative power, then state A will assign a high expected value to continued peaceful trade, will compare this to the low or negative expected value for invasion, and will choose peace as the rational strategy. The higher A’s dependence and the higher the expectations for future trade, the higher the expected value for peaceful trade, and therefore the more likely A is to avoid war. But if state A is dependent and has negative expectations for future trade with B, then the expected value of trade will be very low or negative. If the expected value for trade is lower than the expected value for invasion, war becomes the rational choice, and this is so even when the expected value of invasion is itself negative: war becomes the lesser of two evils. 7 34. This is developed formally in Copeland, â€Å"Modelling Economic Interdependence and War. † 35. See Peter Liberman, â€Å"Does Conquest Pay? The Exploitation of Occupied Industrial Economies† (Ph. D. diss. , Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1991). 36. Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War,trans. Rex Warner (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1954), Book 1, lines 80-88. 37. When one state is very large and the other very small, it is harder to sort out the effects of interdependence from the effects of relative power, at least in actual cases of war. The expected value of war for the superior state is likely to be quite positive anyway, and thus will tend to overshadow the expected value of trade even when the state has positive expectations of future trade. Here, the superior state simply chooses war as the â€Å"greater of two goods. † This choice would not be altered by any diminution of trade expectations; indeed, war would simply be even more rational as the expected value of trade (and therefore peace) falls. War in such a situation of marked power imbalance and low expectations of future trade is thus overdetermined; it would be difficult to tell whether war occurred because of the positive expected value of war, the negative expected value of trade, or both. Thus, in my empirical analysis, I examine cases where great powers InternationalSecurity 20:4 | 22 Until now, I have talked about state A’s â€Å"expectations of future trade† as though they were an essentially exogenous, that is, as though state B, in its willingness to trade with A, were not affected by A’s behavior. If, however, state A, by making political, military, or economic concessions, can induce B to relax trading restrictions, then A’s low expectations for future trade may be raised. This suggests that the effects of diplomacy and bargaining need to be integrated into any extended historical analysis. 38 The probability of B trading with A is never completely independent of A’s actions, since there is always some concession that A could make to get B to commit to higher trade levels over the long term. But the problem for A is that B’s price for high trade may be unacceptable in that it undermines A’s internal stability or its external power position. To take an extreme example, if B were to demand, as the price for higher trade, that A unilaterally disarm and allow B to occupy A with its army, it is hard to imagine A accepting such a deal. If B remains unwilling to budge from such an exorbitant demand, then it is fair to say that A’s pessimistic expectation for future trade is exogenous; there is little A can do, short of national suicide, to improve the likelihood of trade. Thus state A, in estimating B’s probability of trading with A, will refer to many indicators suggesting how â€Å"reasonable† B will be into the future, that is, how willing B will be to trade, and at what price. One may think of these indicators simply as causal factors affecting the variable â€Å"expectations of future trade. † Such systemic factors as B’s economic competitiveness, B’s rate of depletion of raw materials and energy reserves (affecting its future export ability), and military pressures constraining B’s trade with A will be important. German leaders before World War I, for example, had good reason to believe that Britain would be forced to move to imperial preference to protect its empire from the German economic challenge and to lend support to its entente partners. Japanese leaders in the late 1930s recognized that the United States would have to cut back on oil and iron exports to Japan as U. S. reserves were attacked great powers in long and costly total wars. While these cases do not cover the universe of wars, they do isolate the role of economic interdependence and changing expectations of future trade in the outbreak of war. 8. Given space constraints, my case studies in this article do not provide a full analysis of the bargaining dynamic. For an analysis of interstate economic bargaining, see Baldwin, Economic Statecraft,chap. 6; R. Harrison Wagner, â€Å"Economic Interdependence, Bargaining Power, and Political Influence,† InternationalOrganization,Vol. 42, No. 3 (Summer 1988), pp. 461-483. Note also that there may be a causal feedback loop, whereby increasing fears of war lead others to reduce trade, which in turn heightens the incentive of dependent states to initiate war. These and other issues involving the endogeneity of trade expectations are addressed more fully in my book manuscript, â€Å"Economic Interdependence and War. † EconomicInterdependence nd War | 23 a depleted or needed to supply a military buildup (even one directed only at Germany). Such systemic pressures on B to reduce trade with A will foster negative expectations of future trade among A’s leaders. But domestic and personal factors can also play a significant role in the exogenous rise or decline in B’s likelihood of trading with A, indicating hat the assumption that B is a â€Å"unitary actor† must be relaxed to some degree when examining history. 39 In 1972, for example, the Soviets saw Nixon and Kissinger as firmly in control of American policy, and therefore able to carry through on commitments to increase East-West trade. Two years later, however, such a positive expectation for future trade could not be sustained in the wake of Watergate and the r eassertion of Congressional power, at least at a price which was reasonable to the Soviets. This had much to do with the failure of detente, as I argue elsewhere. 40 A comparison of the arguments of trade expectations theory with those of liberal and realist theory is presented in Table 1. To summarize: liberals contend that high economic dependence, as manifest in high trade levels, reduces a state’s likelihood of initiating war by providing a material â€Å"constraint† on unit-level forces for aggression. Low dependence will increase this likelihood, since this constraint on unit-level motives for war is removed. Realists argue that high dependence heightens the probability of war as dependent states struggle to reduce their vulnerability. In the realist world, however, low dependence should have no impact on the likelihood of war or peace; that is, other factors should become causally determinant of war. Still, since economic interdependence is at least eliminated as a possible source of conflict, realists 39. Note that state A, the decision-making unit in the theory, can still be treated as a rational unitary actor respondingto the observed domestic forces on the other side. 0. See Copeland, â€Å"Modeling Economic Interdependence and War,†pp. 62-66. International trade institutions such as the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), by lowering transaction costs and facilitating the punishment of cheaters, may be an additional means to build positive expectations for future trade. Indeed, for some liberals, peace may only be likely when both interdependence and effective glob al institutions co-exist and reinforce one another; Keohane, â€Å"International Liberalism Reconsidered,† p. 183. While such institutions may indeed affect trade expectations, they are unlikely to be as significant in history as the systemic and domestic factors just discussed, for the simple reason that these institutions are a creation of the post-World War II era. Moreover, since concerns for war and peace revolve mostly around the great powers, and powers like Soviet Union and China have been historically excluded from trade institutions like GATT, such institutions cannot account for fluctuations in the levels of tension between the United States and these powers since 1945. Finally, the institutional approach overlooks bilateraldiplomacy as the principal mechanism through which expectations of trade change; consider the United States and Japan up to December 1941, or the United States and Japan today. Accordingly, while my argument recognizes the contribution institutions can make to the improvement of future trade expectations, the focus both theoretically and empirically remains fundamentally non-institutional. 2 S International ecurity 0:4 | 24 4– C/) CO D C o C CD co -0 Co 0 0 0 C CO N E cn C 0 0 -;– a) co C 0 +-, w CM C0 w n E C CD+M † 1 CD CD :3 C CO C CD 0 :3 +, -0 0 m W W cn CD4- ‘a cn 0 c: c CD 0 D- 0 m N C C: W CD CD cn E +, an c 0 +. ,cn Cn CO CD 0 u – :3 0 -0 CC CD a CD 0 Co 0 0 0 +, cn co co o co co CL 0 C CD :3 - C-D C W 0 co E cD w C co C Ew CD C C CD E E0 CD C 0) Cn CD - 77 cn 0 CD 0 CD E C -C W CD -0 +, C cn 0 CD CD Cn a ‘. CD CD co C co co 0 -i cn 0 0 co CD CD a rCO CD CD Co w 0 W W C: CD co CL W cn :3 -0 CD E 00 -0 cn ‘a C C LrCD 0 = cn +, C – C CD CD C -0 CD CO CD la Co C: CD -0 cn +, C: CD CD CD 0 co CDcn 0 CD +†, cn -C n :3 0 0 w 40 . 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Sunday, December 8, 2019

Many teenagers and pre

Many teenagers and pre-teens rely on magazines Essay It is true that some girls are naturally this thin but it gets unhealthy when girls actually strive for these numbers. All the girls thought that skinny girls had the good, perfect life. They could get anything they wanted. They also said that the perfect girl has long blonde hair, nice teeth and nice skin. These are also characteristics that are portrayed to society. We also have seen part of a film, Dying to be Thin, which talked about body image as well. It showed girls who had eating disorders because they wanted to be very skinny like the girls they have seen on television or in magazines. I find it strange that there are not many self destructing magazines geared toward minority teenagers. I dont think they would sell as well as the magazines for white girls do. This is probably because minorities are taught to love themselves no matter what they look like. They are told that they are all beautiful. There is much higher self esteem within these groups. I have had a few friends (white girls) who actually had parents who told them that they were fat and they needed to lose some weight so they should back off of the junk food and eat more salad! These women know what it is like growing up so I dont understand why they would bring their daughters down like this. Parents are supposed to help their children during rough times such as adolescence. In the reading Self and Identity Development, by Susan Harter, feelings that young women tend to have regarding themselves during adolescence include obnoxious, tolerant, introverted, popular, cheerful and depressed. This magazine did not talk about any of these feelings. Instead it said that girls should always feel happy and cheerful. It would probably be nice for young women to read that they are not alone in their feelings and that it is completely normal for quick mood changes. I remember feeling confused like there was something wrong with me because I acted so differently in different situations. These magazines could possibly have an advice column about personality changes. I found two advertisements that I believe to be completely unsuitable for this magazine. The first is for tubes of lip gloss. However, nowhere in the ad does it show anybody actually wearing the lip gloss. It shows a bunch of girls going thru a food take out window and grabbing the employee. The employee is a young boy who is going to get taken advantage of. The worst part about this ad is the caption. It reads: Girls Night Out: 11:03 p. m. picking up some munchies. In other words, the boy is the girls munchies. They do not mean munchies as in food because the food is still in the bag and thrown out the window of the car. The girls look extremely starved for the boy. I do no think this ad is appropriate for young girls. It is telling them to jump all over a guy. The second ad I chose to talk about is one for a fragrance called juice. It has a picture of a girl and a guy who both look naked. They are lying on top of each other and she is licking him. Now, I do not understand how this picture has ANYTHING to do with a fragrance. Does she like to lick it off of him and try it? I do not think so. The couple is lying on a beach and has mysterious looking grins on their faces. I did not know that a fragrance could make a person so happy. Another thing that does not fit is the fact that they are on a beach and are all wet. .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73 , .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73 .postImageUrl , .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73 , .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73:hover , .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73:visited , .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73:active { border:0!important; } .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73:active , .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73 .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .ub40a57b593f3d928cd5b62b1839dae73:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: -The Lotos-Eaters By Tennyson EssayThe fragrance would not still be on them if they were swimming in an ocean. There is also a small caption on this ad which reads GET IT ON. Telling 13, 14, 15 year old girls to roll around on a beach almost naked and to get it on is quite disturbing in my eyes. After analyzing this issue of Seventeen I found only two surprises. I did not realize how stereotypical the models were in these magazines. There was only one, ONE, black model. All the rest looked exactly alike with the exception of either blonde or light brown hair. Young girls are not getting the right picture of the world. They are getting the beautified picture. They are getting a mold pushed onto them that they should not hold themselves up to. The second surprise I found was that the magazine never mentioned anything about sexuality. It just assumes that all of its readers are heterosexual. This has to make adolescents who believe they may be into people of their same sex feel even more excluded than they already feel. Teen magazines may be fun to read but I do not believe they are very beneficial to young girls. Adolescent girls are too naive to read and see the things in these magazines.

Sunday, December 1, 2019

Winslow Homers Breezing Up Essay Example For Students

Winslow Homers Breezing Up Essay Winslow Homers Breezing Up The1873 masterpiece Breezing Up, by Winslow Homer located in theNational Gallery of Art in Washington DC is an oil on canvas painting thatmeasures 23 3/13 X 38 1/6 in.. The primary subject of this painting is a manwith three boys in a small wooden sail boat that is moving along with whatappears to be a fairly choppy sea. At the center of this painting is the sternof the sail boat. The oldest of the boys is sitting on the high end of the sternwith his knees up and his bare feet planted flat on the deck in order to keephim from slipping down into the water. This image forms a powerful triangle inthe center of the painting. The boy?s use of only one hand on the tiller linecombined with his relaxed posture suggest that he is very much at ease with hisresponsibility of steering the boat. His face is only visible in a semi-profileview which exposes his chin, left cheek, and eye socket. These features are welldefined against thick layers of puffy clouds which are lingering over the water. We will write a custom essay on Winslow Homers Breezing Up specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now Like the others in the boat he is facing away from the setting sun which causesthe light to reflect off the back of his long sleeved shirt and hat. Just to theboy?s right is the man in the boat who is presumably the father of the boys. His seated position below the deck allows the viewer only to see his faceshoulders, arms, and hands. His red long sleeved shirt is the brightest color inthe painting, and his calloused hands show strength as he holds the halyard firmin the cleat with a fully extended arm. Of the four people in the boat he is theonly one with a troubled look on his face. According to David Prown this is avery common characteristic in Homer?s work. He says: Although the adults ofHomer?s world seem isolated, his children frolic together in a cheerful worldof laughter and mutuality. For Homer, growing up seems to imply a loss, a fallfrom paradise, removal from happy, carefree innocence and high spirits to aserious, lonely existence in which each man is an island unto himself. (Prown86) This is the perfect description of the expressions of the people in thispainting. The children are clearly relaxed and content, but the father has anexpression that suggests that he has something weighing heavy on his mind , andthat he is receiving only temporary relief as he relaxes on the water with hissons. The other two boys are relaxing up towards the bow of the boat. The olderof the two is stretched out across the deck covering the width of the bow withhis leather shoes hovering inches over the water. The youngest of the boys issitting up right on the deck with his feet resting inside the boat and he has apleasant look of deep thought on his face. Clearly all of these boys are relaxedand content with their surroundings. Numerous fish inside of the boat suggestthat this group has had an afternoon of fishing and recreation. They are notdressed for serious fishing, so there is a good chance they are out therestrictly for leisure. A building off the bow on the distant shore is barelyvisible, and combined with the long shadows of the setting sun, it seems thatthey are heading home. Homers soft blue sky and puffy white clouds take up 2/3of the canvas, leaving only the bottom third for the water and th e horizon. Thesky is completely empty except for a lone gull who?s wings are lit up by thesun as is hovers directly in line with what appears to be a tiny illuminatedsail of another boat on the very distant horizon. Homer also has an uncommonability to recreate curves just as they would appear in nature. He uses thisability to capture the shape and form of the rolling waves in the sea, by evenmore than that he uses it to capture the human experience. The use of thesunlight as it reflects off the cloths of the people in the boat adds to therealistic nature of this painting. The wrinkles of white cotton shirts of theboy?s are accented brilliantly as the sun illuminates and caused shadows ondifferent parts of their arms. The four people in this painting express morewith their body language that they do with their facial expressions. .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211 , .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211 .postImageUrl , .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211 , .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211:hover , .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211:visited , .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211:active { border:0!important; } .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211:active , .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211 .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .uc79458362c5d413dbf7f756d54b7b211:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Homeless biography EssayParticularly the curve of their backs is evidence of their state of relaxation. In the children there is no evidence of tension in their bodies. This is incontrast with the fathers posture where tension is quite evident. The viewersposition directly off the stern of the sailboat is a privileged one. It allowsHomers style of American realism to be truly revealed. The exact details of thesmall wooden boat are astonishing. He captures everything from the stitches inthe sail to the twist of the lines. Even the grain of the wood in the hull andthe mast are perfectly visible. The attention to detail is magnificent. The useof light and shadows across the sail form a drastic contrast. This contrastgives the viewer a real feel for the way the sun is shinning across the water. The spray of water that washes over the bow as the boat bounces through thechoppy water is another example of Homer?s close attention to detail. There isalso a merchant ship on the horizon on the right side of the canvas that thoughdistant still retains a great deal of detail. The sense of comfort and serenityon the boy?s faces is an interesting contrast to the expression of worry ontheir fathers face, but this worry clearly is not related to their situation onthe water. This work was completed towards the early part of Homers paintingcareer, and this is apparent by the look and shape of the water. As his lifeprogressed, Homer began to focus on the power of the water in the sea, and heearned a reputation for being one of the best painters of his time in regards tohis ability to capture the motion and and power of waves. In this painting thereis less attention given to the water causing it to have very general andundefined characteristic. This neutral aspect of the water gives the pai nting anover all feel of relaxation and comfort. Prown gives an interesting descriptionto this painting in in his book American Painting From its Beginnings to theArmory Show. In this book he states: Breezing Up is a seagoing version of Snapthe Whip. The boys exert a mutual effort for their common delight. One adult ispresent, briefly privileged to share their pleasure. The day is sunny; the airand water are alive. Wind fills the sails, and the boat fairly shudders as itdrives through the choppy sea. The thrust of air against the canvas pulls everyline taut, and hands work to hold this living machine, quick with the breath ofnature under control. (Prown 87). This is a nice description of the work. Itseems that one of this paintings main focuses is the pleasure and beauty ofchildren in nature. BibliographyPrown, Jules. American Painting From its Beginnings to the Armory Show. World Publishing. Cleveland, Ohio. 1969. Winslow Homers Breezing Up Essay Example For Students Winslow Homers Breezing Up Essay The 1873 masterpiece Breezing Up, by Winslow Homer located in the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC is an oil on canvas painting that measures 23 3/13 X 38 1/6 in.. The primary subject of this painting is a man with three boys in a small wooden sail boat that is moving along with what appears to be a fairly choppy sea. At the center of this painting is the stern of the sail boat. The oldest of the boys is sitting on the high end of the stern with his knees up and his bare feet planted flat on the deck in order to keep him from slipping down into the water. This image forms a powerful triangle in the center of the painting. We will write a custom essay on Winslow Homers Breezing Up specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now The boyÃÆ'†¢s use of only one hand on the tiller line combined with his relaxed posture suggest that he is very much at ease with his responsibility of steering the boat. His face is only visible in a semi-profile view which exposes his chin, left cheek, and eye socket. These features are well defined against thick layers of puffy clouds which are lingering over the water. Like the others in the boat he is facing away from the setting sun which causes the light to reflect off the back of his long sleeved shirt and hat. Just to the boyÃÆ'†¢s right is the man in the boat who is presumably the father of the boys. His seated position below the deck allows the viewer only to see his face shoulders, arms, and hands. His red long sleeved shirt is the brightest color in the painting, and his calloused hands show strength as he holds the halyard firm in the cleat with a fully extended arm. Of the four people in the boat he is the only one with a troubled look on his face. According to David Prown this is a very common characteristic in HomerÃÆ'†¢s work. He says: Although the adults of HomerÃÆ'†¢s world seem isolated, his children frolic together in a cheerful world of laughter and mutuality. For Homer, growing up seems to imply a loss, a fall from paradise, removal from happy, carefree innocence and high spirits to a serious, lonely existence in which each man is an island unto himself. Prown 86 This is the perfect description of the expressions of the people in this painting. The children are clearly relaxed and content, but the father has an expression that suggests that he has something weighing heavy on his mind, and that he is receiving only temporary relief as he relaxes on the water with his sons. The other two boys are relaxing up towards the bow of the boat. The older of the two is stretched out across the deck covering the width of the bow with his leather shoes hovering inches over the water. The youngest of the boys is sitting up right on the deck with his feet resting inside the boat and he has a pleasant look of deep thought on his face. Clearly all of these boys are relaxed and content with their surroundings. Numerous fish inside of the boat suggest that this group has had an afternoon of fishing and recreation. They are not dressed for serious fishing, so there is a good chance they are out there strictly for leisure. A building off the bow on the distant shore is barely visible, and combined with the long shadows of the setting sun, it seems that they are heading home. Homers soft blue sky and puffy white clouds take up 2/3 of the canvas, leaving only the bottom third for the water and the horizon. The sky is completely empty except for a lone gull whoÃÆ'†¢s wings are lit up by the sun as is hovers directly in line with what appears to be a tiny illuminated sail of another boat on the very distant horizon. Homer also has an uncommon ability to recreate curves just as they would appear in nature. .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401 , .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401 .postImageUrl , .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401 , .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401:hover , .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401:visited , .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401:active { border:0!important; } .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401:active , .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401 .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .ufa2cad14558ebf8f341f0a59bbd9f401:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Gustav Klimt - "The Kiss" painting EssayHe uses this ability to capture the shape and form of the rolling waves in the sea, by even more than that he uses it to capture the human experience. The use of the sunlight as it reflects off the cloths of the people in the boat adds to the realistic nature of this painting. The wrinkles of white cotton shirts of the boyÃÆ'†¢s are accented brilliantly as the sun illuminates and caused shadows on different parts of their arms. The four people in this painting express more with their body language that they do with their facial expressions. Particularly the curve of their backs is evidence of their state of relaxation. In the children there is no evidence of tension in their bodies. This is in contrast with the fathers posture where tension is quite evident. The viewers position directly off the stern of the sailboat is a privileged one. It allows Homers style of American realism to be truly revealed. The exact details of the small wooden boat are astonishing. He captures everything from the stitches in the sail to the twist of the lines. Even the grain of the wood in the hull and the mast are perfectly visible. The attention to detail is magnificent. The use of light and shadows across the sail form a drastic contrast. This contrast gives the viewer a real feel for the way the sun is shinning across the water. The spray of water that washes over the bow as the boat bounces through the choppy water is another example of HomerÃÆ'†¢s close attention to detail. There is also a merchant ship on the horizon on the right side of the canvas that though distant still retains a great deal of detail. The sense of comfort and serenity on the boyÃÆ'†¢s faces is an interesting contrast to the expression of worry on their fathers face, but this worry clearly is not related to their situation on the water. This work was completed towards the early part of Homers painting career, and this is apparent by the look and shape of the water. As his life progressed, Homer began to focus on the power of the water in the sea, and he earned a reputation for being one of the best painters of his time in regards to his ability to capture the motion and and power of waves. In this painting there is less attention given to the water causing it to have very general and undefined characteristic. This neutral aspect of the water gives the painting an over all feel of relaxation and comfort. Prown gives an interesting description to this painting in in his book American Painting From its Beginnings to the Armory Show. In this book he states: Breezing Up is a seagoing version of Snap the Whip. The boys exert a mutual effort for their common delight. One adult is present, briefly privileged to share their pleasure. The day is sunny; the air and water are alive. Wind fills the sails, and the boat fairly shudders as it drives through the choppy sea. The thrust of air against the canvas pulls every line taut, and hands work to hold this living machine, quick with the breath of nature under control. Prown 87. This is a nice description of the work. It seems that one of this paintings main focuses is the pleasure and beauty of children in nature.